Jul 28 2019

Italy: Communique of Alfredo Cospito from the prison of Ferrara

via: actforfree
Alfredo, from the prison of Ferrara, asks for this short communiqué to be circulated, excusing himself for not having done so earlier but he was completely isolated in the hospital. He sends a hug to everyone.
Prison of Ferrara, 14/07/2019
“I give you the tragicomic news that after 5 hours’ operation my bloody gall bladder has abandoned us (July 8) due to the hunger strike. Excuse me but I still can’t answer your many letters decently. But count on my answers. The only positive thing is that I have lost 21 kg.
Keep on writing to me.
Sure that the struggle in solidarity with the comrades proceeds ever more effectively.”
Alfredo
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Translated by Act for freedom now!
via:anarhija.info

Apr 9 2019

Interview with Anarchist Comrade Alfredo Cospito (Ferrara Prison- Italy)

via Inferno Urbano and Abolition Media Worldwide

The following text is from the second part of “Which international? Interview and dialogue with Alfredo Cospito from the Ferrara Prison,” part of a debate that some comrades are undertaking with imprisoned anarchist comrade Alfredo Cospito, published in winter 2019 in the anarchist newspaper “Vitriol” in Italian.

Analyzing the history of the movement of the exploited, of the poor, oppressed and proletarians, we see that anarchist ideas are born, nourished and developed in these contexts; on the other hand, most of the anarchists also come from there (of course there are also exceptions). These ideas were born mainly during the birth and growth of industrial capitalism (indicatively from the early 1800s to the 1970s), and up to 40 years ago, the organizations of the exploited and of the workers are mainly mass and the anarchist groups (and the individuals who are part of them) are also the fruit of that historical era. With the advent of capitalist restructuring in the 1980s, followed by a drastic change in the world of work, even anarchist action and organization undergo changes; to the classic organizations of synthesis (or mass), the less rigid structures, based on affinity and informality, are opposed. The new technological restructuring, based mainly on robotics will obviously lead to other drastic changes (mass unemployment) and the new proletarians will probably be employed in moving goods. In this context, in which the impoverishment of the proletarians (and obviously the exploitation of humans, animals and land) and the wealth of the exploiters will increase, does it still make sense to talk about class struggle? Are there still margins to involve – in the struggle for the destruction of this techno-industrial civilization – the exploited, the proletarians, the excluded? Should we try or renew forms of struggle organization? Continue reading